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Youngest pilot on round-the-world record flying mission, passes half-way ma...

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ATR, Airbus Help Open Commercial Floodgates to Iran

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

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iranair ATR, Airbus Help Open Commercial Floodgates to Iran

The diplomatic breakthrough between the West and Iran has resulted in nearly immediate windfalls for Airbus and Franco-Italian turboprop maker ATR, the beneficiary of a new firm order announced Monday from Iran Air covering 20 ATR 72-600s. The €1 billion deal, which includes options on another 20 of the turboprops, followed talks in Rome and Paris during the official visit to Europe of Iranian president Hassan Rohani. The Iranian contingent sealed a deal covering 118 Airbus widebodies while meeting with French President François Hollande at the Élysée Palace in Paris last Thursday.

Iran Air’s contract with Airbus includes orders for 21 airplanes from the current A320 family, 24 A320neo-family airplanes, 27 of the current A330 family, 18 A330-900s, 16 A350-1000s and 12 A380s. The deal for the A380s comes as a particularly welcome boost for Airbus, which has struggled to sell the superjumbo in recent years.

Following Monday’s announcement, ATR praised the Italian and French states for their role in the deal through the participation of their export credit agencies, respectively, Sace and Coface. The contract marks the long-awaited arrival of modern ATRs in Iran, where the first generation of the turboprops have operated since 1992.

The agreements took place as part of the implementation of the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan Of Action) on January 16. Under that deal, Iran has agreed to significantly curb its nuclear ambitions and allow the International Atomic Energy Agency regular access to its facilities for inspection.

Economic sanctions imposed on Iran by the West for many years have hindered the development of its air transport industry, leaving the likes of Iran Air with decrepit fleets of maintenance-intensive aircraft, many acquired before the 1979 Islamic Revolution. A lack of availability of spare parts kept many airplanes grounded or flying in questionable condition, making Iran’s airlines some of the world’s most accident-prone.

February 1, 2016, 11:11 AM

Source:: http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/aerospace/2016-02-01/atr-airbus-help-open-commercial-floodgates-iran

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Short Final

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

While flying from Chicago to Bismarck, North Dakota on New Year’s Day, my co-pilot and I were monitoring 121.5 when someone asked if anybody had any New Year’s resolutions. … Without skipping a beat, my co-pilot keyed the mic and responded: “Yeah, NOT talking on Guard!” … To which someone else responded: “Yeah, me too.” — Jim Burns

Source:: http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/shortfinal/Short-Final-Aviation-Humor-225614-1.html

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European Bizav Operators Unprepared for EASA Part-NCC

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

Non-commercial operators of more than 6,000 business jets and turboprop twins based in Europe soon will be affected by EASA’s new Part-NCC (non-commercial complex) rules that require higher safety standards, attendees were told at a conference run by Aeropodium late last week at London Heathrow Airport. Beginning August 26, these operators will have to comply with a similar safety framework to that for commercial air operating certificate holders, but on the basis of a “declaration” by an “accountable manager” that they are compliant. The move will affect business aircraft registered in an EASA state or those registered in a non-EASA state by an operator that is established or resides in an EASA state.

Preparation for Part-NCC will include having a safety management system (SMS) in place, as well as compliance monitoring, an operations manual, minimum equipment list, record-keeping and various training requirements. Performance and operating limitations and equipment all have to be covered in detail for all aircraft. It all comes under the provisions of EU Regulation 965/2012, but although it concerns EASA, it is the national authorities that will administer Part-NCC.

Joel Henks of AeroEx, who chaired the conference, warned, “After [the deadline] you must comply or be grounded.” The rules will affect operators in all 28 EU member states and the four European Free Trade Association states (Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). But it will also affect “third country” operators from the rest of the world that fly their aircraft to destinations in Europe. “This affects those of you who have aircraft registered in so-called third countries,” said Henks.

The definition of “complex motor-powered aircraft” is an mtow greater than 5,700 kg (12,566 pounds), more than 19 seats or a certified minimum crew of at least two, as well as any aircraft equipped with one or more turbojet engines or two or more turboprop engines. Thus it is wide-ranging and is expected to catch many small operators, said Philippe Renz, a lawyer with Renz & Partners.

Given the broad definition of complex aircraft, Part-NCC could cover “an aero club, a state authority, private owner, a registered owner or a special purpose company,” said Renz. He noted that the risks are huge given the potential aftermath of any accident, “so the question of who should sign the declaration and admit to being in control is difficult.”

Renz pointed to another gray area, where the operator has its “principal place of business.” He said, “This raises lots of complex questions. For example, is it possible to delegate operational control to an organization in Dubai, Russia or Isle of Man?”

Aeropodium is holding another seminar focusing only on this issue on March 14 in London. This will be of interest in particular to operators with “aircraft registered in third countries and used ‘into, within and out of the community by an operator established or residing in the community,’” said Renz. This will be covered by Part-TCO (third-country operators), he said, admitting that “the EU wants to impose its system on third-country aircraft.”

Simon Williams, director of Civil Aviation of the Isle of Man, expressed concerns about duplication of oversight. “It looks like there is an additional inspection that the state of the operator has to do. EASA has perhaps trespassed on ICAO here, saying the state of operator [the relevant competent authority] has to approve something we do anyway. There is potential for a conflict of oversight through duplication, so it’s going to quite challenging come August 26.”

Hamburg, Germany-based WingX Advance managing director Richard Koe said that the number of aircraft that appeared to be with operators that had their principal place of business in an EASA state numbered around 2,428 jets, of the 21,450 business aircraft worldwide. Of those, around 495 were with non-commercial operators, which he called “the candidate fleet.” There are 1,200 aircraft with N-registrations that are active in the EU, according to his review of various registers. The U.S. and Isle of Man together (N and M registers) account for 12 percent of aircraft.

Also counting turboprops twins, WingX’s records indicate that there are 6,131 aircraft that will be affected by Part-NCC. Koe noted that 75 percent of aircraft in Europe “belong to single-tail operators,” and many of these will fall into the NCC bracket, suggesting that there is a business opportunity here for service providers.

February 1, 2016, 10:48 AM

Source:: http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/business-aviation/2016-02-01/european-bizav-operators-unprepared-easa-part-ncc

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Crosswind catches C185

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

While taking off from Runway 32 at the airport in Fredericksburg, Texas, the Cessna 185 encountered a crosswind. As soon as the tailwheel came off the runway, the plane veered to the left.

The pilot attempted to correct with the application of right rudder and brake, however the plane continued off the runway. The right wing dragged on the ground and the right main landing gear separated, resulting in substantial damage.

Wind at the time of the accident was recorded as 240° at 10 knots, gusting to 14 knots.

The NTSB determined the probable cause as the pilot not maintaining directional control of the airplane during the takeoff with a gusting crosswind.

NTSB Identification: CEN14CA177

This February 2014 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Source:: http://generalaviationnews.com/2016/02/01/crosswind-catches-c185/

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Decision to try aerobatics fatal

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

A witness reported that the pilot made a radio transmission announcing his intention to perform a rolling maneuver in the RANS S10.

He and another witness stated that they then saw the airplane roll through an inverted position and then transition into a steep, high-speed dive.

The left wing separated from the fuselage and the airplane continued in a near-vertical descent until hitting the ground near the airport in Shepherd, Texas.

Post-accident examination revealed that the left front wing spar had fractured near the left wing root due to overload.

No records were found indicating that the non-certificated pilot had received dual flight instruction for aerobatics, and the pilot’s friend reported that he did not think that the pilot had ever received any aerobatic flight training.

A review of the pilot’s journal revealed that he had recently attempted solo aerobatics in the RANS S10, which resulted in high-speed spiral dives at airspeeds higher than the never exceed speed for the airplane. The pilot likely attempted an aerobatic maneuver that exceeded the airplane’s design limitations, which resulted in the subsequent in-flight breakup of the airplane.

The NTSB determined the probable cause as the pilot’s improper decision to attempt aerobatic maneuvers that exceeded the airplane’s design limitations, which resulted in the subsequent in-flight breakup of the airplane. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s lack of aerobatic flight instruction.

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA140


This February 2014 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Source:: http://generalaviationnews.com/2016/02/01/decision-to-try-aerobatics-fatal/

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Crew Fist Fight Diverts Flight: Report

| Aviation News | July 7, 2016

A Delta Airlines flight from LAX to MSP last week diverted to Salt Lake City after what is reported to have been a fist fight–involving at least two flight attendants. The Aviation Herald is reporting the captain of Flight 2598 headed the Boeing 757 for Salt Lake Jan. 22 after two flight attendants were in a dispute that got physical.

Source:: http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/Crew-Fist-Fight-Diverts-Flight-Report-225610-1.html

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ANA confirms order for three A380s

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

All Nippon Airways (ANA) has confirmed that it has ordered three Airbus A380s that will be used on its Tokyo-Honolulu route.

Source:: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/ana-confirms-order-for-three-a380s-421377/

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Scholarship winner puts award to good use

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

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Photo 2 of Kelly Hicks to Accompany Previous AVTRIP Scholarship winner put 2013 award to good use 94x125 Scholarship winner puts award to good use

Avfuel’s AVTRIP Scholarship recipient from 2013, Kelly Hicks, is soaring to new heights after completing training to obtain her multi-engine rating.

“It’s been the best experience,” said Hicks. “Receiving my multi-engine rating means I’ve accomplished my dream— I can now fly the King Air, my favorite aircraft since childhood. This just solidifies that I have achieved my goals.”

Photo 1 of Kelly Hicks with King Air to Accompany Previous AVTRIP Scholarship winner put 2013 award to good use Scholarship winner puts award to good use

Kelly Hicks with her beloved King Air.

With her qualifications, Hicks serves as a contract pilot for an oil field company, flying its King Air and TBM aircraft. Wearing many hats, she switches between her flight attendant and pilot roles, making each day unique.

Though it wasn’t an easy journey, Hicks said she kept her nose in her books and obtained multiple ratings over the past three years.

Photo 2 of Kelly Hicks to Accompany Previous AVTRIP Scholarship winner put 2013 award to good use Scholarship winner puts award to good use

The process started by obtaining her private pilot license in 2014 in her hometown of Stephenville, Texas. From there, she used the AVTRIP Scholarship toward her instrument rating in the spring of 2015 through American Flyers in Addison, Texas, where she also obtained her commercial rating in the summer of 2015.

“Though everyone said the commercial rating would be the easiest part, I actually found it the most challenging,” said Hicks. “Practicing chandelles and lazy eights in the midst of a hot July in Texas makes for an uncomfortably bumpy experience, but I wouldn’t have traded it for the world!”

Photo 3 of Kelly Hicks with J3 Cub to Accompany Previous AVTRIP Scholarship winner put 2013 award to good use Scholarship winner puts award to good use

Kelly with her uncle’s J3 Cub.

Following her commercial training, in the fall of 2015 Hicks received a tailwheel endorsement flying her uncle’s J3 Cub, as well as her multi-engine rating from Tom Brady at Traverse Air in Traverse City, Michigan, allowing her to finally fly her beloved King Air.

“The AVTRIP Scholarship from Avfuel really did help me achieve my goals by helping finance my instrument rating,” said Hicks.

Hicks is now looking forward to her next adventure. One of the companies for which she serves as a flight attendant has approached her about becoming its first officer in a Beechjet once she obtains enough flying hours.

“They’re dangling a carrot in front of me,” said Hicks. “I’m excited for what’s to come and enjoying living my dream.”

Source:: http://generalaviationnews.com/2016/01/29/scholarship-winner-puts-award-to-good-use/

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Pilot Error Caused 2014 TransAsia Crash, Council Determines

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

Pilot error was to blame for the July 23, 2014 crash of a TransAsia Airways ATR 72-500 that claimed 48 lives, Taiwan’s Aviation Safety Council (ASC) has determined. The twin turboprop crashed into a residential area while on approach to Magong Airport on Penghu Island, in the Taiwan Strait, during a thunderstorm.

Seven months later, a TransAsia ATR 72-600 crashed into Taiwan’s Keelung River after taking off from Taipei Songshan Airport, resulting in 43 deaths. The ASC continues to investigate that accident.

In a final report on the 2014 crash released on January 29, the council stated that “contrary to standard operating procedures” the pilots executed an approach to the airport below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) when they could not see the runway. The aircraft, operating as Flight GE 222, had departed from Kaohsiung International Airport on the Taiwan mainland with 58 passengers and crew on board. It collided with terrain 850 meters northeast of the threshold of Magong Airport Runway 20.

“Flight crew coordination, communication, and threat and error management were less than effective. That compromised the safety of the flight,” the ASC stated in a summary of its findings. “The first officer did not comment about or challenge the fact that the captain had intentionally descended the aircraft below the published minimum descent altitude. Rather, the first officer collaborated with the captain’s intentional descent below the MDA.” Neither of the pilots recognized the need for a missed approach until the aircraft reached the point where a collision with terrain became unavoidable, the council added.

The ASC report contains 29 safety recommendations. Among them, the council calls on aircraft manufacturer ATR to “evaluate the feasibility of a modification” to provide a new enhanced ground proximity warning system on all ATR 72-500s.

January 29, 2016, 3:11 PM

Source:: http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/air-transport/2016-01-29/pilot-error-caused-2014-transasia-crash-council-determines

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Sandel taps Stevens Aviation for Avilon

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

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Sandel Avilon 125x47 Sandel taps Stevens Aviation for Avilon

Sandel Avionics has selected Stevens Aviation as one of its exclusive Avilon dealerships.

The Sandel Avilon Avionics Suite is an all-glass integrated flight deck for the King Air family, starting with the KA-200, designed and assembled at Sandel for easy installation, according to company officials.

Sandel Avilon Sandel taps Stevens Aviation for Avilon“This changes everything as it gives the customer a fully replaceable, high performance avionics system that meets all 2020 NextGen regulations, installs in as little as five days, and all for a price many more can afford,” said Phil Stearns, sales manager, Stevens Aviation.

Avilon offers a fly-away, fully installed system for an expected $175,000.

All three Stevens Aviation locations, located in Dayton, Ohio (DAY), Nashville, (BNA) and Greenville, S.C. (GYH) are designated authorized Avilon Installation Centers and are set to install this system starting in June.

Source:: http://generalaviationnews.com/2016/01/29/sandel-taps-stevens-aviation-for-avilon/

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PICTURES: SriLankan Airlines retires last A340

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

SriLankan Airlines has retired its Airbus A340-300 fleet after 21 years in service.

Source:: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/pictures-srilankan-airlines-retires-last-a340-421327/

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Cessna Announces 2016 Top Hawk Universities

| Aviation News | January 31, 2016

Cessna Aircraft launched the second year of its Top Hawk university program, announcing this week its 2016 participants: Kent State University, LeTourneau University, Purdue University and Westminster College. Each school will receive a new Cessna 172 in February to support flight training, recruiting, and promotional activities throughout the year.

Source:: http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/Cessna-Announces-2016-Top-Hawk-Universities-225605-1.html

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