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News and Updates – FAA Air Traffic Report

| FAA News | August 22, 2017

Today’s Air Traffic Report:

Thunderstorms in the Midwest, Southeast and Gulf of Mexico likely will delay flights today in Atlanta (ATL), Chicago (MDW, ORD), Miami (MIA) and New Orleans (MSY). High winds could slow traffic in the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA), and morning low clouds may stall flights in Denver (DEN), Philadelphia (PHL) and San Francisco (SFO).

Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Source:: https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=83585&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Launching a More Agile and Efficient FAA Flight Services Service

| FAA News | August 22, 2017

August 22 The Federal Aviation Administrations Flight Standards Service (AFS) plays a vital role in making the U.S. aviation system the worlds safest. But even the best can get better.

On August 20, AFS made organizational adjustments that will enable it to operate with greater accountability, better use of resources, and more readiness to adapt to change. The FAA expects the Flight Standards restructuring to yield benefits to both the agency and the U.S. aviation community. It will strengthen the organizations ability to keep pace with changes in the aviation industry, increase the Services ability to derive maximum benefit from the fixed resources allocated to the agency, and make sure AFS employees develop and interpret regulations and policy consistently across the organization.

To enhance the AFS safety culture, interdependence, critical thinking, and consistency will now embedded in every AFS employee’s work requirements. And to facilitate a more agile, efficient, and consistent organization, the service is reorganizing from today’s structure, see current org chart, to one based on function, see new org chart.

The FAA issued an Information for Operators bulletin (InFO) on July 26 to provide industry with information to help prepare for the AFS reorganization. The agency has also established a web page to give the aerospace community more detail on the AFS changes.

Source:: https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=88644&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – FAA Air Traffic Report

| FAA News | August 22, 2017

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impacts to normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Today’s Air Traffic Report:

Thunderstorms are forecast to move from the central plains to the mid-Atlantic today, creating challenges for cross-country air travel and for airports in the East. Afternoon flight delays are possible in the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA) and at high altitudes around New York and Washington, D.C. Flights headed to or leaving Atlanta (ATL), Charlotte (CLT) and Chicago (MDW, ORD) may be routed around the storms.

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=83585&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – FAA Policy Helps Modernize GA Airplanes and Helicopters

| FAA News | August 22, 2017

July 7- A new Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) policy encourages general aviation aircraft owners to voluntary install safety equipment on airplanes and helicopters that is not required by the agencys regulations. It will reduce costs and streamline the installation of Non-Required Safety Enhancing Equipment (NORSEE) into the general aviation fleet.

The policy is the result of indutsry and government collaboration under the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee and expands the 2014 FAA policy, which simplified the design approval requirements for a cockpit instrument called an angle of attack (AOA) indicator. AOA devices can be added to small planes to supplement airspeed indicators and stall warning systems, alerting pilots of a low airspeed condition before an aerodynamic stall occurs. Such stalls are particularly dangerous during takeoff and landing.

NORSEE includes avionics, electronic instruments, displays and mechanical equipment. Equipment approved as NORSEE increases overall situational awareness; provides additional information other than the aircraft primary system; provides independent warning, cautionary, or advisory indications; and provides additional occupant safety protection. Examples of NORSEE equipment include: traffic advisory systems, terrain awareness and warning systems; attitude indicators; fire extinguishing systems; and autopilot or stability augmentation systems.

The policy has the flexibility to accommodate the installation of new technology safety enhancements into Part 23, 27, and 29 aircraft that are determined to be a minor change to type design. The benefits must outweigh the risk. The policy will reduce equipment costs by allowing the applicants the flexibility to select various industry standards that suit their product, as long as it meets the FAAs minimum design requirements.

NORSEE approval under this policy is not an approval for installation on the aircraft it just makes the equipment eligible for installation on the aircraft. There may be a situation in which installation of the equipment on the aircraft requires modifications that are considered a major change to type design, or major alteration to the aircraft. In these cases, the applicant is required to pursue the appropriate certification path (such as a supplemental type certificate), or field approval process, regardless of the non-required designation. The FAAs online list of approvals will be updated regularly.

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=85907&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Compliance Philosophy 101

| FAA News | January 29, 2016

January 27- The January/February 2016 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAAs new Compliance Philosophy and what its foundational concepts mean to the general aviation community. Articles in this issue discuss how the agency and aviation community can identify a problem in the National Airspace System , use the most effective tools to correct that problem, and monitor the situation to be sure it stays fixed in the future.

Feature articles include:

How do You do Safety? Developing Sound Risk-Based Decision Making Practices in Aviation (p 10),In Data We Trust: Does Flight Data Monitoring Hold the Key to Improving GA Safety? (p 18),Compliance Philosophy with General Aviation The FAAs Evolving Culture on Aviation Safety (p. 23)

In this issues Checklist department (p. 22), editor Susan Parson looks at the FAAs evolving safety role and its focus on risk-based decision making, while Vertically Speaking (p 30) highlights the role of Safety Management Systems (SMS) for rotorcraft operators. Be sure to also check out FAA Administrator Michael Huertas message on Compliance Philosophy in Another First in Our Safety Evolution on page 8, as well as how you can help be an ambassador for drone safety (p 29).

FAA Safety Briefing is the safety policy voice for the non-commercial general aviation community. The magazine’s objective is to improve safety by:

making the community aware of FAA resourceshelping readers understand safety and regulatory issues, andencouraging continued training

Be sure to follow us on Twitter@FAASafetyBrief

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84705&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Scheduled Maintenance for UAS Registration System

| FAA News | January 16, 2016

January 15- The Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Small Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) registry will be unavailable from 10 p.m. to midnight, EST on Saturday, January 16 due to scheduled maintenance.

The agency reminds owners who previously operated an unmanned aircraft exclusively as a model aircraft prior to December 21, 2015 they must register no later than February 19, 2016. Owners of any other UAS purchased for use as a model aircraft after December 21, 2015 must register before operating the first flight outdoors.

Time is running out for owners to register for free. Owners who register before midnight EST on January 21 will receive a refund for the $5 registration fee. The registration website will initially charge the owners credit card the $5 fee, but a credit will appear in approximately 7-10 business days.

To register, visit the the UAS Registration page.

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84585&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Flight Restrictions During State of the Union Address

| FAA News | January 9, 2016

January 8- Temporary flight restrictions will be in place during the State of the Union Address in Washington, DC on January 12, 2016.

Flight Advisory (PDF)NOTAM (PDF)

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84512&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Charlotte Leads in NextGen Air Traffic Improvements

| FAA News | January 8, 2016

January 8- North Carolina wasfirst in flightwhen the Wright Brotherstook to theskies atKitty Hawk, andnow its leadingthe way to the next generation of air traffic control.NextGen proceduresarehelpingflights operate more efficientlyat Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT), improvingon-time performanceand decreasingemissions.

The CharlotteMetroplexprojectincludes new arrival and departure proceduresfor CLTand surrounding airportsin North Carolina, South Carolina and southern Virginia.Procedural changes in Charlotte areat altitudes between 3,000 and 14,000 feetand do not affect the airports voluntary noise abatementprocedures.

Metroplexinitiativessuch as this area key element of the FAAsNextGenair traffic control modernization, which is replacing decades-old ground-based navigationwith more precise procedures based on satellite navigation.Similar projectsarein place or underwayin12 majormetropolitan areas nationwide.

Based on July 2015 data,the FAAestimatesthe changesin Charlottewill result in 28,000 fewer metric tons of carbon in the air each year, which is equivalent to removing more than 5,000 cars from the road.Airlines will consume3.3 millionfewergallons of aircraft fuel,valued atabout$9.4 million.

Charlotte Douglaspresentsunique challenges,with limited space for aircraftto maneuverafter they push back from the gate. Taxiways also are congested asaircraftmove to and from the runways.The FAA, in collaboration with air carriers and the airport, is working withtheNational Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)to developthe nations mostsophisticated system for managingarrivalsanddepartures.When completed, the airport will be among the most efficient in the country,reducing the amount of time that airplanesspend on taxiwaysgenerating noise and emissions.

Charlotteis amongthe first airports to useDataCommunications,which operates much liketext-messagingbetween air traffic controllers and flight crews forroutine communications such asclearances, instructions, advisories,and flight crew requests.DataComm enhancessafety byenablingcontrollers to give more timely and effective clearances.Better communication improves controller and pilot productivity, which enhances airspace capacity and reduces flight delays.Air traffic controllers currently use radio voice communications to give clearances and other flight information to pilots.

Charlotte is building on its legacy as a leader in aviation thanks to the technology and innovation from NextGen.

Learn more about NextGen in Charlotte:

>Video of NextGen Solutions in Charlotte

>NextGen Performance Snapshots

Link for press to download event materials: http://bit.ly/FAA-CLT

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84510&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – FAA Releases B4UFLY Smartphone App

| FAA News | January 7, 2016

January 6- Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Michael Huerta today announced the public release of the B4UFLY mobile application following an initial beta testing period.

B4UFLY tells users about current or upcoming requirements and restrictions in areas of the National Airspace System (NAS) where they may want to operate their unmanned aircraft system (UAS). The app is now available for Apple devices and can be downloaded from the App Store.

The FAA also is releasing a beta version of B4UFLY for Android devices, which can be downloaded from Google.

We expect B4UFLY will help raise public awareness about what it means to operate unmanned aircraft safely, Huerta said at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, NV. It is another important part of our education and awareness efforts to foster a culture of safety and accountability for the UAS community.

The B4UFLY app includes a number of enhancements the FAA developed as a result of user feedback during the beta testing announced in May 2015 . Within two taps, users know if it is safe to fly at their current location. The app provides a status indicator that tells users: Proceed with Caution, Warning Action Required, or Flight Prohibited. The app also features a planner mode that allows users to select a different time and location for an upcoming flight and determine if there are any restrictions at that place and time.

By law, hobbyists who want to fly within five miles of an airport must notify the airport operator and the air traffic control facility (if there is one) prior to flying. For now, B4UFLY will ask users who are supposed to notify the airport before flying for voluntary information about their planned flight. This will not meet the statutory requirement to notify the airport and air traffic control facility, but the data will help the agency make informed policy decisions related to notification. This information will not be publicly available.

You can find more information on our B4UFLY webpage.

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84508&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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Speech – Consumer Electronic Press Event

| FAA News | January 7, 2016

Administrator Michael Huerta
Las Vegas, Nevada

Remarks as prepared for Delivery

This is my first visit to CES and as I walked through the convention center floor, I was really struck by the incredible breadth of products that are on display. Its truly remarkable and its a reminder that we should never underestimate the transformative power of technology.

If youre around my age, you probably knew someone who, 30 or so years ago, scoffed at the idea that people would ever have a need for personal computers. And just a couple of years ago, few people envisioned the growth were seeing today in the recreational use of unmanned aircraft.

Weve heard various estimates about the number of small drones that would be sold for recreational use this past holiday season. While the numbers vary, its clear that retailers expected to sell a significant number. Safely integrating all of these new pilots into our National Airspace System is one of the FAAs top priorities to protect manned aircraft, to protect people on the ground, and to protect innovation.

This is not going to be a finite process, where one day we sit back and say OK, were done. Maintaining the highest levels of safety requires us to constantly evolve in our approach, whether were talking about commercial aircraft like Boeing 747s, or unmanned quadcopters that weigh a few pounds.

Over the past year, working with our government, industry and model aircraft community partners, we have made very significant progress on this front. And the coming year is going to be an exciting and challenging time as we continue to support existing initiatives and implement new ones while leveraging our partners energy and creativity to identify even more integration strategies.

We reached one of our most significant integration milestones just before Christmas when we implemented an easy-to-use, web-based drone registration system. The system went live just two months after Secretary Foxx and I announced the initiative.

The speed with which we were able to roll it out is a testament to the commitment and hard work of the diverse task force we set up to help design the system. Its proof that government, working with private industry, can innovate, cut through red tape, and use technology to tackle emerging challenges.

Four of our task force partners are with us here today. Their collaboration is critical to our ongoing efforts to get the word out about the registration requirement and in promoting safe flying practices.

Simply put, registration is all about safety. It provides us with a key opportunity to educate the new generation of airspace users that as soon as they start flying outside, theyre pilots. There are safety implications to how they fly, and there are rules and regulations they must follow. It also will help them become part of the safety culture that has been deeply embedded in traditional aviation for more than a century, while still allowing for the recreation and innovation that are staples of American aviation. And, when necessary, registration will help us track down people who operate unsafely.

Registration is simple and its mandatory for aircraft that weigh between 0.55 pounds and 55 pounds. You enter basic information name, address and email address into our online system, and read and acknowledge our basic safety guidelines. Then you pay $5 the fee will be refunded if you register by January 20th and get a registration number. Your registration is valid for three years, and you can register an unlimited number of aircraft that you intend to use for recreational purposes.

Were offering live registration at our UAS booth on the convention center floor in the unmanned systems marketplace, so I encourage you to pay a visit down there.

Were encouraged by the registration numbers were seeing so far. As of today, about 181,000 aircraft have been registered. But this is just the beginning. Now that we have set up the registration system, our challenge is to make sure everyone is aware of the requirement and registers.

Our partnerships such as Know Before You Fly are critical.

Know Before You Fly began just 13 months ago as a partnership involving the Association of Unmanned Vehicles International, the Academy of Model Aeronautics and the FAA. Today, it has expanded to include more than 50 members including 20 that joined in November and December alone.

I want to stress how important this campaign is in spreading the word about safe flying and the addition of new partners continues to add to its value and reach.

But we also must constantly evolve in our approach and identify new methods of reaching all the new airspace users out there and new methods of making the registration process even easier for consumers. For example, we are working to support potential third-party applications, such as smart phone apps, that could enable manufacturers or retailers to scan a code on a drone and automatically register it.

You may also be aware that we have been working for the past several months on our own smart phone app, B4UFLY, which tells people about current or upcoming restrictions where they want to fly their unmanned aircraft. We introduced B4UFLY last August for limited beta testing, and we made a number of enhancements to it based on our testers feedback.

I am pleased to announce that later today, an updated iOS version of B4UFLY will be available for the general public, free of charge. Were also going to release an Android version today for beta testing, as we did last year for the iOS version.

The app provides clear direction with a status indicator, which tells the user Proceed with Caution, Warning Action Required or Flight Prohibited. The app also features a planner mode that allows the user to see if there are any restrictions at a different time and location for an upcoming flight.

Like UAS registration, we expect that B4UFLY will help heighten public awareness about what it means to operate unmanned aircraft safely.

A number of other important developments around education are occurring with our partners that you might not be aware of.

Additional companies are including Know Before You Fly materials in their packaging joining DJI, Parrot and Yuneec, which began doing so last year.

Retailer Best Buy put Know Before You Fly information on the receipts of everyone who bought drones this past holiday season.

The Consumer Technology Association is leading an effort to standardize unmanned aircraft serial numbers to make it easier to identify specific aircraft. The idea here is to enable a computer app to scan an aircraft serial number and automatically populate the registration file with make, model and serial number without anyone having to manually enter the number into the system. Google and Parrot are partners in this initiative. This might not be glamorous work, but its an important part of our work to safely integrate drones.

The FAA also issued important guidance last month to states and municipalities that are considering laws or regulations addressing UAS use. Our guidance explains that any local laws should be consistent with the extensive federal regulatory framework for aircraft and airspace use. It explains that a consistent regulatory system ensures the highest level of safety for all aviation operations.

A lot of our recent public focus has been on recreational drones, but weve also been working on a rule that will allow routine, safe commercial and other non-hobby operations of small unmanned aircraft. We expect to finalize the rule in late spring of this year.

Meanwhile, we have authorized more than 3,000 commercial operators on a case-by-case basis, ranging from movie filming and smokestack inspections to aerial photography and land surveying. While we have streamlined the current authorization process, the rule will greatly decrease the need for case-by-case approvals, increasing commercial operators ease of access to the National Airspace System.

Were also going to continue working with our Pathfinder Program industry partners to explore unmanned aircraft operations that go beyond those proposed in the rule. Were going to take every opportunity to promote our pre-flight safety checklist. And were going to do more outreach that is targeted to drone pilots so theyre aware of No Drone Zones for specific events and conditions, such as the Super Bowl and upcoming wildfire season. We want to give pilots the ability to fly safe and smart so they can enjoy all the benefits of their unmanned aircraft.

No initiative is going to be the single solution when it comes to safely integrating unmanned aircraft be they for commercial or recreational use into our National Airspace System.

Our job is to create a new culture in aviation so that all users, old and new, understand the importance of operating safely, and know what their responsibilities are. I am confident that, working together with our partners in safety, we will succeed.

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/speeches/news_story.cfm?newsId=19895&omniRss=speechesAoc&cid=104_Speeches

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News and Updates – Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

| FAA News | January 6, 2016

The FAA and general aviation (GA) groups #FlySafe national safety campaign aims to educate the GA community on how to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents.

What is Loss of Control (LOC)?
A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure from controlled flight. LOC can happen when an aircraft operates outside its normal flight envelope and could quickly develop into an aerodynamic stall or spin, surprising the pilot.Contributing factors may include poor judgment/aeronautical decision making, failure to recognize a stall or spin and execute timely corrective action, or intentionally failing to follow regulations. Inexperience in a particular make and mode of aircraft, lack of piloting ability, failure to maintain airspeed, failure to follow procedure or the use of over-the-counter drugs that affect pilot performance have also been cited as playing a role in this type of accident.

Current topic:
Many fatalities could be avoided if pilots are better informed and trained on how to fly at the best glide speed when preparing for a forced landing.

What is the best glide speed?
Simply put, best glide speed is the airspeed at which the aircraft glides the farthest with the least loss of altitude. If faced with a forced landing situation, the best airspeed depends on what youre trying to do. Are you looking to cover the greatest distance or the longest time in the air? Heres what you need to know:

Distance: Use the speed and configuration that will get you the most distance forward for each increment of altitude lost. This is often referred to as the best glide speed. On most airplanes, its roughly half-way between Vx and Vy. Keep in mind that speed increases with weight, so most manufacturers establish the best glide speed at the maximum gross weight for the airplane. This means your best glide speed will likely be a little lower.

Time: If you need to stay in the air as long as possible to fix a problem or communicate your intentions and prepare for a forced landing, then you want the minimum sink speed. This speed is rarely found in the Pilot Operating Handbooks; it will be a little slower than the maximum glide range speed.

What about my airplane?
Plan to experiment on a flight with your Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI). Start at Vy, or the manufacturers recommended best glide speed with power off, and note the speed versus sink rate as you adjust pitch to reduce airspeed. You should be as close to mission weight as possible. To identify minimum sink speed, look for the highest speed forward that will give you the lowest rate of decent. Knowing these speeds will give you important numbers to have in the back of your mind if a situation ever warrants their use.

How far can I glide?
A rule of thumb for Cessna 152s and 172s is 1.5 nautical miles per 1,000 feet of altitude above ground level. Experiment to see how far your airplane can glide.

Tips for pilots
There is no substitute for frequent practice at typical mission weights. One trick is to choose a spot between the first and second third of the runway or landing area for an initial aiming point. If you determine that you can make that initial spot, add flaps and perhaps slip the airplane to move the aiming spot to the first third of the landing area. Its better to land long than to stall or land short of the runway.

For a gliding approach, youll want to reach a key position from which you know you can make a successful landing during your base leg. Until the key position is reached, keep the airplane configured for best glide. After you pass the key position, add flaps and gear to configure the airplane for landing and fly the final approach at 1.3 times the stalling speed in landing configuration (1.3 Vso).

When was the last time you practiced these maneuvers? They can help provide a better understanding of best glide speed when maneuvering to complete a forced landing.

90-degree power-off approach and landing180-degree power-off approach360-degree power-off overhead approachOverhead spiral approach

Message from FAA Deputy Administrator Mike Whitaker:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our Fly Safe campaign. Each month on FAA.gov, were providing pilots with a Loss of Control solution developed by a team of experts. They have studied the data and developed solutions some of which are already reducing risk. We hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

Did you know?

Approximately 450 people are killed each year in GA accidents.Loss of Control is the number one cause of these accidents.Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.There is one fatal accident involving LOC every four days.

Learn more
The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (Chapter 8) has several helpful diagrams for different power-off landing scenarios and corresponding key points.

The FAASafety.gov website has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics.

Check out the 2015 GA Safety Enhancements (SEs) fact sheets on the main FAA Safety Briefingwebsite, including Flight Risk Assessment Tools.

The WINGS Pilot Proficiency Program helps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of accidents in GA.

An FAA fact sheet outlines GA safety improvements and initiatives.

The Fly Safe campaign partners are: Air Bonanza Society (ABS) Air Safety Foundation, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA), Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), FAA Air Transportation Center for Excellence (COE) for General Aviation, FAASTeam, GA Joint Steering Committee, General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), Helicopter Association International (HAI), Lancair Owners and Builders Organization (LOBO), 1800wxbrief/Lockheed Martin, National Air Transportation Association (NATA), National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI), National Business Aircraft Association (NBAA), Soaring Society of America (SSA), Society of Aviation and Flight Educators (SAFE), and the U.S. Parachute Association (USPA).

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84506&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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News and Updates – Good N.I.G.H.T.

| FAA News | December 30, 2015

December 29- The November/December 2015 “Good Night” issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on general aviation night operations. Articles in this issue address the importance of having both the right physical and mental preparation for flying at night, as well as how technology can help.

In this issue, we used the word NIGHT as a mnemonic checklist for all of the content in this night-themed issue. Feature articles include:

N = Nightlights Using Pilot Nightlights to Find Your Way in the Dark (p 12),I = Illusions Nighttime Perils of Perception (p 16),G = Gadgets Glowing Gadgets and Gizmos (p. 20)H = Human Factors How Night Can Be Hazardous to Your Flying Health (p 24)T = Terrain Avoidance What Does it Take to Use NVGs? (p 28)

In this issues Aeromedical Advisory department (p. 5), Federal Air Surgeon Dr. James Fraser explains the importance of finding the right Aviation Medical Examiner, while Checklist (p 23) highlights tips for avoiding close encounters of the wildlife kind. Also, as part of a series of articles to highlight the importance of ADS-B equipment, Clifton Stroud from the FAAs NextGen Performance and Outreach Office discusses the benefits of ADS-B In on page 8.

FAA Safety Briefing is the safety policy voice for the non-commercial general aviation community. The magazine’s objective is to improve safety by:

making the community aware of FAA resourceshelping readers understand safety and regulatory issues, andencouraging continued training

Be sure to follow us on Twitter-@FAASafetyBrief

Source:: http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84446&omniRss=news_updatesAoc&cid=101_N_U

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